Want to become a Close Protection Officer (CPO)? Here are some basic steps to follow.

Want to become a Close Protection Officer (CPO)? Here are some basic steps to follow.

Know what a CPO does This job comes with a load of responsibilities and needs a person who can be accountable for their decisions and actions. A CPOs

Getting clients as a bodyguard
The job description of a close protection executive
A Close protection officer has endurance and eagles eyes

Know what a CPO does

This job comes with a load of responsibilities and needs a person who can be accountable for their decisions and actions. A CPOs principle role is ensuring the security and comfort of their clients. They should be able to avoid any kind of confrontation at all cost and see to it that the client is enjoying a normal life’s activities.

The role also involves attending high profile events. Sadly as a CPO, you hardly enjoy the actual events since you spend the entire event outside being alert to the surrounding environment. There is tough competition in this industry and finding jobs can be rather challenging. You need to up your networking skills as this has proved to be a reliable way of connecting with clients.

Which area to specialize on

High Risk (Hostile Environment, HE) and Low Risk (Executive Protection, EP) are the two major areas in the course of working as a bodyguard. Both will require a permit from SIA therefore select the training in line with your area of focus. High risk zones include areas that are prone to violence and war like Iraq, Afghanistan etc., where previous experience in the army is a prerequisite for training as a CPO. Topics to be covered in such training are wide and intense and cannot be done in a month. Low Risk involves learning the CPO code of behavior, undercover techniques etc. A good Executive Protection officer does not get noticed in a function and people assume that he is just one of them.

Training school

Always train with the experts. You will get a list of authorized training institutions on the SIA website and this is a good place to shop for one. You could also read reviews on the trainers’ website to see what their former students are saying about them.

The course outline should have plenty of practical sessions as this is the best approach of training. Choose a course that specializes in your area of focus, i.e. if your focus is surveillance, then chose a trainer that specializes in that too. The training cost is directly proportional to the duration of the course.

Getting ready for training

Read and do some research before the actual course begins. This is usually helpful in demystifying myths and fictional information about CP. Some trainers will provide you with materials for reading, otherwise you can read online. Submit your Front line Application form for SIA CP through their website so that you can get it as soon as you finish the training.

Actual training

This is where it all goes down. Make sure to bring in all necessary personal items. Get to class ahead of time so that you can interact with your mates. Be willing to cooperate with the trainers to make it easy for them, your mates and yourself. Be professional but enjoy the learning process.

Getting the license

Make sure to provide all required information correctly in the application form. The waiting time can range from 6 weeks to 6 months. Patience is key both in waiting for the license. You can make follow ups to SIA through email, which is more reliable as opposed to calling them as getting through can prove challenging.

Presenting yourself

Your CV needs to sell you before the actual meeting with a potential client. Present your resume in a subtle manner. Ensure you have a professional email address. Provide brief experience history highlighting key responsibilities and avoid telling lies.

COMMENTS

WORDPRESS: 0
DISQUS: 0